Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Departmental Office: 401 Knox; 212-854-2556
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/mesaas/

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Timothy Mitchell, 407 Knox; 212-854-5252; tm2421@columbia.edu

Language Coordinators:
African Languages: Mariame Sy, 408 Knox; 212-851-2439; sms2168@columbia.edu
Arabic: Taoufik Ben Amor, 308 Knox; 212-854-2985; tb46@columbia.edu
Armenian: Charry Karamanoukian, 407 Knox; 212-851-4002; ck2444@columbia.edu
Hebrew: Naama Harel, 410 Knox Hall, 212-854-6668; nh2508@columbia.edu
Hindi/Urdu: Rakesh Ranjan, 409 Knox; 212-851-4107; rr2574@columbia.edu
Persian: Saeed Honarmand, 313 Knox; sh3468@columbia.edu
Sanskrit: Tyler Richard, 311 Knox; 212-854-1304; tmr2151@columbia.edu
Tamil: Tyler Richard, 311 Knox; 212-854-1304; tmr2151@columbia.edu
Turkish: Zuleyha Colak, 412 Knox; 212-854-0473; zc2208@columbia.edu

The undergraduate program in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African studies (MESAAS) offers students the opportunity to study in depth the cultures, ideas, histories, and politics of several overlapping world regions. The program emphasizes a close engagement with intellectual traditions, creative movements, and political debates, drawing on a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources in literature, religion, political thought, law, the visual and performing arts, and new media. Courses also examine the historical and cultural contexts in which these traditions and debates have been produced.

Majors and Concentrations

Majors develop two closely related skills. The first is linguistic expertise. A minimum of two years of course work in one language is required, and further work (including intensive summer language study) is greatly encouraged, because the aim is to study a cultural field through its own texts and discourses. The Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies offers courses in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Hebrew, Armenian, Sanskrit, Hindi/Urdu, Bengali, Tamil, Swahili, Wolof, and Zulu.

The second skill is learning how to think and write about complex cultural formations, drawing on a variety of methods and disciplinary approaches. The approaches vary according to the faculty members' expertise, incorporating methods from relevant fields in the humanities and social sciences, such as literary criticism, film studies, cultural studies, political theory, and intellectual history.

The only difference between the MESAAS major and the concentration is that the latter does not require language proficiency.

Professors

  • Gil Anidjar
  • Muhsin J. Ali al-Musawi
  • Partha Chatterjee
  • Hamid Dabashi
  • Mamadou Diouf
  • Laura Fair
  • Wael Hallaq
  • Gil Hochberg
    Sudipta Kaviraj
  • Rashid Khalidi
  • Mahmood Mamdani
  • Joseph Massad
  • Brinkley Messick
  • Dan Miron (emeritus)
  • Timothy Mitchell
  • Sheldon Pollock
  • Frances Pritchett (emerita)
  • George Saliba (emeritus)

Associate Professors

  • Mana Kia
    Anupama Rao
  • Jennifer Wenzel

Assistant Professors

  • Sarah bin Tyeer
  • Debashree Mukherjee
  • Elaine van Dalen
  • Elleni Centime Zeleke

Senior Lecturers

  • Aftab Ahmad
  • May Ahmar
  • Taoufik Ben Amor
  • Zuleyha Colak
  • Naama Harel
  • Saeed Honarmand
  • Abdul Nanji
  • Youssef Nouhi
  • Rakesh Ranjan

Lecturers

  • Ouijdane Absi
  • Rym Bettaieb
  • Abdelrazzaq Ben Tarif
  • Ihsan Colak
  • Reem Faraj
  • Illan Gonen
  • Charry Karamanoukian
  • Danielle Katz
  • Khatchig Mouradian
  • Tyler Richard
  • Shiv Subramaniam
  • Mariame Sy

On Leave

  • Sarah bin Tyeer
  • Laura Fair
  • Mahmood Mamdani
  • Youssef Nouhi
  • Sheldon Pollock
  •  
  •  

Guidelines for all Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies Majors and Concentrators

Introduction to MESAAS

Majors and concentrators begin their work with an introductory course that emphasizes a particular area (the Middle East, South Asia, or Africa). For instance, students interested in the Middle East would take ASCM UN2003 Introduction to Islamic Civilization or ASCM UN2008 CONTEMP ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION. Students keen on learning more about South Asia would take ASCM UN2357 Introduction to Indian Civilization, HSME UN3810 History of South Asia I: al-Hind to Hindustan, or HIST W3811 South Asia II: Empire and Its Aftermath. The introductory course generally recommended for students interested in Africa is MDES UN2030 Major Debates in the Study of Africa.

Required Core Courses

All majors must take two additional core courses. The first is a small seminar in which they explore some of the classic texts of the region, either AHUM UN1399 Colloquium on Major Texts: Middle East and South Asia (for those focusing on the Middle East and South Asia) or AFCV UN1020 African Civilizations (for those focusing on Africa).

With this background, students are ready to take MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture generally in the junior or senior year. This course examines critical approaches to the study of language, culture, and politics and encourages students to reflect on their own work from many different perspectives.

Additional Requirements

Fifteen additional points (generally five courses) are chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. These may include six points of coursework from other departments, subject to the director of undergraduate studies' approval. Although students may have a particular interest (e.g., Arab political thought, Urdu literature, Armenian history, Iranian cinema, or contemporary West Africa), they are encouraged to gain exposure to the fullest range of courses and approaches offered by the faculty, and to familiarize themselves with other regions beyond their core area.

In Fulfillment of the Language Requirement (for Majors)

Enrollment in language courses is in some cases determined by placement exams. For more information, see Languages on the departmental website and, if necessary, consult the relevant Coordinator listed on that page. The website includes separate pages for each language, describing the program of instruction, courses for heritage speakers, summer language programs, and more. Language courses must be taken for a letter grade. Pass/D/Fail or Registration credit (R) is not permitted. Those seeking to waive a language requirement must take a proficiency test.

Students who enter with language proficiency at only the second-year level must complete one additional year of language study and one additional MESAAS course. When students enter with language proficiency at the third year level (or in cases where only two years of a particular language are offered in MESAAS), they must substitute three additional MESAAS courses.

Advising

Newly declared majors and concentrators should meet with the director of undergraduate studies in order to plan a program of study. The goal is to strike a balance between courses that help a student achieve depth in a particular area/discipline and those that foster a wider perspective.

Although students are encouraged to approach faculty in the department based on their specific interests, the director of undergraduate studies functions as an ad hoc adviser for all entering students, addressing issues of course requirements, credit, approval for courses in other departments or schools, study abroad, and, eventually, honors requirements (including the senior thesis). Students should not hesitate to contact the director of undergraduate studies to set up an appointment.

Grading

Courses in which the grade of D has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements, nor do those taken Pass/D/Fail, except for the first course taken toward the major or concentration.

Honors Program/Senior Thesis

Students may also wish to write a thesis. While not required for graduation, the thesis enables a student to be considered for departmental honors. It is advisable to begin planning for the thesis during the student's junior year. Interested students should attend the relevant information sessions and identify a potential faculty adviser.

All students who wish to write a thesis must enroll in MDES UN3960 MESAAS Honors Thesis Seminar, a full year course consisting of a 1-point segment in the Fall semester and a 3-point segment in the Spring semester. Students work closely with their peers in a supportive environment to produce a substantial piece of research (in the range of 40 pages). The primary intellectual guidance is provided by the faculty adviser, whereas the director of undergraduate studies and the honors seminar teaching assistant oversee the general development of the project. Every year in April, MESAAS hosts a senior colloquium in which students present their research. For more information on the honors program, see Frequently Asked Questions on the departmental website.

For additional guidelines, see Departmental Honors as outlined in the Academic Honors, Prizes, and Fellowships section of the Columbia College Bulletin.


Major in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Students should obtain a Major Declaration form from their advising dean and bring it to the director of undergraduate studies for approval. The director of undergraduate studies meets with students as necessary in order to establish and approve their individual programs of study. The requirements for the major are as follows:

Students should obtain a Major Declaration form (available in the online major declaration system or from your adviser) and bring it to the director of undergraduate studies for approval. The director of undergraduate studies meets with students as necessary in order to establish and approve their individual programs of study. The requirements for the major are as follows:

Select a one-term introductory culture course, to be approved by the director of undergraduate studies
AHUM UN1399Colloquium on Major Texts: Middle East and South Asia
MDES UN3000Theory and Culture
Select two years of a language regularly taught in the department, or substitutional courses for students who test out of this requirement with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies
Select 15 points of coursework, which may include up to six points from other departments, selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies


The MESAAS Major and its ‘tracks

Students majoring in MESAAS are studying the languages, and central cultural and political aspects of the societies of the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa, in past and present. This can be done either with a focus on one of these three regions, i.e. the ‘African Studies’, the ‘South Asian Studies’, or the ‘Middle Eastern Studies’ track, or a comparative perspective on them, the ‘combined track’.

The coursework for each of those ‘tracks’ is composed of the same five elements: 1. an approved Introductory course; 2. a seminar on texts from the region; 3. 'Theory and Culture'; 4. five approved elective courses; 5. the regional language requirement. 

Note that some MESAAS courses are already comparative by design and connect more than one region: for example, Societies and Cultures Across the Indian Ocean, or Postcolonial Thought, or courses on Persianate culture that include North India, or Middle East courses that include North Africa. These may satisfy requirements for more than one track, subject to approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS).

African Studies

1. MDES UN3130 Major Debates in the Study of Africa or another approved introductory lecture course.
2. CC1020 African Civilization
3. MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture
4. Five additional courses on Africa, such as: South African Literature and Culture: Apartheid and After; East Africa and the Swahili Coast; or Pan Africanism (see the Courses page for more options). You may include up to two courses from other departments, in fields such as African history, politics, and philosophy, the anthropology of Africa, and African art, subject to the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. For a listing of courses in other departments, see here.
5. Language: A minimum of two years of course work in Swahili, Arabic, Pular, or another African language. See the MESAAS language programs here. Those already fluent in an African language may substitute other courses—see FAQ. Not required for the concentration.

Middle Eastern Studies

1. ASCM UN2003 Islamic Civilization or another approved introductory lecture course.
2. Asian Humanities UN1399 Major Texts: Middle East/India
3. MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture
4. Five additional courses on the Middle East, such as: Arabic Self-Narratives; Central Questions in Islamic Law, Palestinian-Israeli Politics and Society, or Epics and Empires (see the Courses page for more options). You may include up to two courses from other departments, in fields such as Middle Eastern history, politics, and anthropology, or Islamic art, subject to the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Find a list of Middle East courses in other departments here.
5. Language: A minimum of two years of coursework in Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, or Armenian. See the MESAAS language programs here. Those already fluent in a Middle Eastern language may substitute other courses—see FAQ. Not required for the concentration.

South Asian Studies

1. MDES UN2357 Indian Civilization or another approved introductory lecture course.
2. Asian Humanities UN3399 Major Texts: Middle East/India
3. MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture
4. Five additional courses on South Asia, such as: Mughal India; Gandhi and his Interlocutors; or Cinemas of India(see the Courses page for more options). You may include up to six points of course work from other departments, in fields such as South Asian history, politics, and anthropology, or Indian art, subject to the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Find a list of South Asia courses in other departments here.
5. Language: A minimum of two years of course work in Hindi/Urdu, Sanskrit, Persian, or other South Asian languages. See the MESAAS language programs here. Those already fluent in a South Asian language may substitute other courses—see FAQ. Not required for the concentration.

Combined

There is also a combined option. For this, you may satisfy the five requirements by choosing courses from any of the three tracks.
1. An approved introductory lecture course.
2. Asian Humanities UN1399 Major Texts: Middle East/India – OR: CC1020 African Civilization 
3. MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture
4. Five additional courses, fitting one’s course of study, to be approved by DUS
5. Language: A minimum of two years of course work in any of the regional MESAAS languages, to be approved by the DUS.


Concentration in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

The requirements are identical with those for the major, except that there is no departmental language requirement. Fifteen points in department courses, selected with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies. These may not include elementary or intermediate language courses. Not more than two courses out of the general 15 points may be devoted to language study.

Lectures and Seminars

MDES UN1001 Critical Theory: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The purpose of this foundational course is to introduce Columbia undergraduate students, in the context of their Global Core curriculum, to the seminal field of critical theory.  The historical domain of this course is within the last century and its geographical spectrum is global.  European critical thinkers are included in this course but not privileged.  Thinkers from Asia, Africa, Europe, North, South, and Latin America, are examined here in chronological order and in equal democratic footing with each other.  This course as a result is decidedly cross-cultural, one step forward towards de-alienating critical thinkers from around the globe and the issues they address without pigeonholing them as something “other” or “different.” 


The course is designed and offered in the true spirit of the “Global Core.”  The purpose of the course is to reach for the common denominator of serious critical thinking about the fate of our humanity and the health of our social relations in an increasingly fragile world—where the false binaries of “the West” and “the Rest” no longer hold.  The roster of critical thinkers we will examine is by no means exhaustive but representative.  Any number of other critical thinkers can be added to this roster but none of those we will examine can be excluded from them. 


The course is divided into thirteen successive weeks and for each week a number of seminal, original, and groundbreaking texts are identified.  Each week we will examine selected passages from these texts.  The course is designed as a lecture course, and my lectures are based on the totality of these texts but students will be assigned specific shorter passages to read. 

ASCM UN2003 Introduction to Islamic Civilization. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Lecture and recitation. Islamic civilization and its characteristic intellectual, political, social, and cultural traditions up through 1800. Note: Students must register for a discussion section, ASCM UN2113.

Fall 2020: ASCM UN2003
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCM 2003 001/12229 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Matthew Keegan 4 57/90

ASCM UN2008 CONTEMP ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Lecture and recitation. No previous study of Islam is required. The early modern, colonial, and post-colonial Islamic world studied through historical case studies, translated texts, and recent anthropological research. Topics include Sufism and society, political ideologies, colonialism, religious transformations, poetry, literature, gender, and sexuality

Spring 2021: ASCM UN2008
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASCM 2008 001/10760 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Matthew Keegan 4.00 0/90

MDES UN3000 Theory and Culture. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Required of all majors. Introduces theories of culture particularly related to the Middle East, South Asia. and Africa. Theoretical debates on the nature and function of culture as a symbolic reading of human collectivities. Examines critical cultural studies of the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa. Enables students to articulate their emerging knowledge of Middle East, South Asian, and African cultures in a theoretically informed language. 

Spring 2021: MDES UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3000 001/10766 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Gil Hochberg 4 0/90

AHUM UN1399 Colloquium on Major Texts: Middle East and South Asia. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Readings in translation and discussion of texts of Middle Eastern and Indian origin. Readings may include the Qur'an, Islamic philosophy, Sufi poetry, the Upanishads, Buddhist sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, Indian epics and drama, and Gandhi's Autobiography.

Fall 2020: AHUM UN1399
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1399 001/11992 F 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Elaine van Dalen 4 19/20
AHUM 1399 002/00583 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Matthew Keegan 4 13/22
AHUM 1399 003/00552 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Nathanael Shelley 4 13/22

MDES UN2641 Cinemas of India. 3 points.

This course offers an expansive journey through the forms, pleasures, and meanings of Indian cinema. It explores the plural beginnings of popular film; the many competing cinemas produced across India; the diverse protagonists (from vamps to vigilantes) that populate the imagined entity named ‘national cinema’; and the varied audiences addressed by these cinemas. Over the course of the semester, we will watch 15 of the most iconic narrative films produced in India, including Diamond Queen (1940), Awara (1951), Deewar (1975), Roja (1992), Mahanagar (1963), and Bandit Queen (1994). As we voyage with the dynamic, shifting codes and priorities of India’s fiction filmmaking, we also shadow the emergence of the Indian nation and contestations of its coherence.

Fall 2020: MDES UN2641
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 2641 001/13142 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Debashree Mukherjee 3 27/25

MDES UN2650 Gandhi and His Interlocutors. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Gandhi is in two senses an extraordinary figure: he was the most important leader of anti-imperialist movements in the twentieth century; yet, his ideas about modernity, the state, the industrial economy, technology, humanity’s place in nature, the presence of God – were all highly idiosyncratic, sometimes at odds with the main trends of modern civilization. How did a man with such views come to have such an immense effect on history? In some ways, Gandhi is an excellent entry into the complex history of modern India – its contradictions, achievements, failures, possibilities. This course will be primarily a course on social theory, focusing on texts and discursive exchanges between various perceptions of modernity in India. It will have two parts: the first part will be based on reading Gandhi’s own writings; the second, on the writings of his main interlocutors. It is hoped that through these exchanges students will get a vivid picture of the intellectual ferment in modern India, and the main lines of social and political thought that define its intellectual culture. The study in this course can be followed up by taking related courses in Indian political thought, or Indian politics or modern history. This course may not be taken as Pass/D/Fail.

Spring 2021: MDES UN2650
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 2650 001/10906 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Sudipta Kaviraj 4 0/60

HSME UN2915 Africa Before Colonialism: From Prehistory to the Birth of the Atlantic World. 4 points.

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the precolonial history of the African continent. It investigates in-depth the political, social, cultural and economic developments of different Africa communities, covering various regions and periods, from prehistory to the formation of the Indian Ocean and Atlantic worlds. Its focus is the intersection of politics, economics, culture and society. Using world history and Africa’s location in the production of history as key analytical frames, it pays special attention to social, political and cultural changes that shaped the various individual and collective experiences of African peoples and states and the historical discourses associated to them.

Fall 2020: HSME UN2915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HSME 2915 001/12654 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Mamadou Diouf 4 23/60

MDES UN3042 Palestinian and Israeli Politics and Society. 4 points.

The History of the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskala) in 19th century Europe and the development of Zionism through the current "peace process" between the state of Israel and the Arab states and the Palestinian national movement. Provides a historical overview of the Zionist-Palestinian conflict to familiarize undergraduates with the background of the current situation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES UN3042
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3042 001/10920 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Joseph Massad 4 0/60

MDES UN3047 MESAAS & History: Court Cultures 350-1750. 3.00 points.

The course provides a broad survey of court societies and cultures as they grew and spread their influence in premodern world, especially South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. We will study Indic, Persianate and Islamicate cultural formations in the courtly sphere and discuss the larger trends that facilitated their emergence. Rather than moving chronologically from ‘early medieval’, ‘medieval’ to ‘early modern’ periods we will move thematically looking at the ways in which the court functioned as an institution and enabled particular cultural and intellectual practices. One of the major sub-themes that we will discuss covers the idea of genres and recording practices. What were the modes of courtly expression of the past? How did such practices shape the idea of ‘history’ in the premodern world? We will locate the institution of the court within a network of relations with other political institutions – most importantly the Hindu, Islamic and Buddhist religious centers. Along with this, we will consider ways in which kings, queens, courtiers, courtesans, poets, scholars, concubines and religious persons contributed to the flourishing of ‘court aesthetics’ and laid the foundations of political style and governance in premodern South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Among primary materials, we will study political poems, plays, prose chronicles and courtly manuals in understanding the nature of political rule. This is an introductory course and prior knowledge of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East – either its languages, geographies or histories – is not required

Spring 2021: MDES UN3047
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3047 001/10771 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Samyak Ghosh 3.00 0/15

MDES UN3121 Literature and Cultures of Struggle in South Africa. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

Generations of resistance have shaped contemporary life in South Africa -- in struggles against colonialism, segregation, the legislated racism known as apartheid, and the entrenched inequalities of the post-apartheid era. Two constants in this history of struggle have been youth as a vanguard of liberation movements and culture as a "weapon of struggle." As new generation of South African youth -- the "born frees" -- has now taken to the streets and social media to "decolonize" the university and claim their education as a meaningful right, this course traces the ways that generations of writers, artists, and activists have faced censorship, exile, and repression in an ongoing struggle to dismantle apartheid and to free the mind, "the most powerful weapon in the hands of the oppressor" according to Black Consciousness activist Steve Biko. This course traces the profoundly important roles that literature and other cultural production (music, photography, film, comics, Twitter hashtags like #rhodesmustfall and #feesmustfall) have played in struggle against apartheid and its lingering afterlife. Although many of our texts were originally written in English, we will also discuss the historical forces, including nineteenth-century Christian missions and Bantu Education, as well as South Africa's post-1994 commitment to being a multilingual democracy, that have shaped the linguistic texture of South African cultural life.

Spring 2021: MDES UN3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3121 001/11189 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Jennifer Wenzel 3 0/54

CLME UN3221 Arabic Literature As World Literature. 4 points.

This seminar focuses on Arabic literature in the world, as World Literature. The focus will be on pre-modern and modern Arabic literary works that traveled and circulated and were adapted to and acquired individual meanings in different cultures. We will look at literary works that achieved ‘worldliness’ through either writing back to the center or through

international literary prizes. We will consider how literary works travel and circulate through their fusion with regional concepts, or even take on new meanings at different times and places. Admittedly, also, we will look into the strengths, weaknesses, and criticism surrounding World Literature.

MDES UN3260 Rethinking Middle East Politics. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course examines a set of questions that have shaped the study of the politics of the modern Middle East. It looks at the main ways those questions have been answered, exploring debates both in Western academic scholarship and among scholars and intellectuals in the region itself. For each question, the course offers new ways of thinking about the issue or ways of framing it in different terms. The topics covered in the course include: the kinds of modern state that emerged in the Middle East and the ways its forms of power and authority were shaped; the birth of economic development as a way of describing the function and measuring the success of the state, and the changing metrics of this success; the influence of oil on the politics of the region; the nature and role of Islamic political movements; the transformation of the countryside and the city and the role of rural populations and of urban protest in modern politics; and the politics of armed force and political violence in the region, and the ways in which this has been understood. The focus of the course will be on the politics of the twentieth century, but many topics will be traced back into developments that occurred in earlier periods, and several will be explored up to the present. The course is divided into four parts, each ending with a paper or exam in which participants are asked to analyze the material covered. Each part of the course has a geographical focus on a country or group of countries and a thematic focus on a particular set of questions of historical and political analysis.

MDES UN3331 Urban Space and Conflict in the Middle East. 3 points.

This course explores how civil war, revolution, militarization, mass violence, refugee crises, and terrorism impact urban spaces, and how city dwellers engage in urban resilience, negotiate and attempt to reclaim their right to the city. Through case studies of Beirut (1975-present), Baghdad (2003-present), Cairo (2011-present), Diyarbakir (1914-present), Aleppo (1914-present), and Jerusalem (1914-present), this course traces how urban life adjusted to destruction (and post-conflict reconstruction), violence, and anarchy; how neighborhoods were reshaped; and how local ethnic, religious, and political dynamics played out in these cities and metropolises. Relying on multi-disciplinary and post-disciplinary scholarship, and employing a wealth of audiovisual material, literary works, and interviews conducted by the instructor, the course scrutinizes how conflicts have impacted urban life in the Middle East, and how civilians react to, confront, and resist militarization in urban spaces.

 

MDES UN3421 Islamic Central Asia. 3 points.

Explores the cultural landscapes of Islamic Central Asia up to the 18th c. Russian conquests, introducing the wide and changing array of meanings that both Islam and Central Asia could take on in this context. Against the association of Central Asia with a periphery, this course restores the centrality of Central Asia to the spheres of exchange that held together a broader Islamic imaginary, including Persian literatures, Sufism, political thought, and the visual arts. Focuses on the empires of the Ghaznavids (977-1186), Mongols (1206-1370), Timurids (1370-1507), and early Mughals. Readings are English translations of primary sources, and modern scholarship to contextualize and theorize these sources. Central questions include: how these texts reflect and shape community, how they mark and make sense of difference, the ways in which they understand and relate to their past(s), and the values that they hold to be most central. No prerequisites.

Spring 2021: MDES UN3421
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3421 001/10772 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Catherine Ambler 3 0/15

MDES UN3445 SOCIETIES/CULTRS: INDIAN OCEAN. 4.00 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course introduces the Indian Ocean as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture from the medieval to the modern period, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through interregional migration and travel from the 10th to 20th centuries. Different types of people - nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, scholars, slaves - experienced mobility in different ways. How did different groups of people represent such mobilities? What kinds of political, economic, and social cooperation, accommodation or conflict did different Indian Ocean encounters engender? We read some of the newest humanities and social science scholarship, as well as primary sources ranging from manuscript illustrations, sailor’s stories, merchant letters, travelogues, pilgrimage accounts, colonial documents, memoirs, and diplomatic accounts. Students must register for a discussion section, MDES UN3446

Spring 2021: MDES UN3445
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3445 001/11274 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Mana Kia 4.00 0/60

MDES UN3644 Visual Cultures of Modern South Asia. 3 points.

This lecture course introduces students to the power and meaning of popular visual cultures of South Asia. Visual culture is a crucial arena for the enactment of social transformations and the creation of collective imaginaries. We will track such varied modern media types as calendar art, photography, film, architecture, clothing, and religious festivals, loosely following key chronological signposts in the shared histories of the subcontinent. Together, we will practice a new way of understanding history and society – a visual way that will make us aware of the diversity of hopes, fears, and dreams that comprise South Asia. Designed for students with a basic understanding of South Asian history, the course aims to familiarize you with key methodological approaches in visual culture studies and current debates in South Asian art history and media theory.

MDES UN3915 A History of African Cities. 3 points.

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history of African cities. It cuts across disciplinary boundaries of history, geography, anthropology, political and cultural sociology, literature and cultural studies, to explore the vaious trajectories of urbanization on the continent.

Spring 2021: MDES UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3915 001/11139 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Mamadou Diouf 3 0/30

MDES UN3920 Contemporary Culture in the Modern Arab World. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This seminar, designed for seniors, aims to acquaint students with the notion and theoretical understanding of culture and to introduce them to a critical method by which they can study and appreciate contemporary culture in the Arab World. The seminar will survey examples of written and cinematic culture (fiction and autobiography), as well as music, dance, and literary criticism in the contemporary Arab world. Students will be reading novels, autobioghraphies and literary criticism, as well as watch films and listen to music as part of the syllabus. All material will be in translation. Films will be subtitled. Songs will be in Arabic.

Fall 2020: MDES UN3920
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3920 001/12551 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Joseph Massad 3 4/24

MDES UN3923 Central Questions in Islamic Law. 3 points.

Through detailed discussions of certain landmarks in Islamic legal history (e.g., origins; early formation; sources of law; intellectual make-up; the workings of court; legal change; women in the law; legal effects of colonialism; modernity and legal reform, etc.), the course aims at providing an introductory but integrated view of Islamic law, a definition, so to speak, of what it was/is. Please note, this course must be taken for a letter grade.

Fall 2020: MDES UN3923
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3923 001/13493 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Wael Hallaq 3 15/25

CLME UN3928 Arabic Prison Writing. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course studies the genealogy of the prison in Arab culture as manifested in memoirs, narratives, and poems. These cut across a vast temporal and spatial swathe, covering selections from the Quran, Sufi narratives from al-Halllaj oeuvre, poetry by prisoners of war: classical, medieval, and modern. It   also studies modern narratives by women prisoners and political prisoners, and narratives that engage with these issues. Arabic prison writing is studied against other genealogies of this prism, especially in the West, to map out the birth of prison, its institutionalization, mechanism, and role. All readings for the course are in English translations.

Fall 2020: CLME UN3928
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLME 3928 001/13134 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Muhsin Al-Musawi 3 19/20

MDES UN3960 MESAAS Honors Thesis Seminar. 4 points.

Open to seniors who have declared MESAAS as their major only.

Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.5 in MESAAS courses.

The MESAAS honors seminar offers students the opportunity to undertake a sustained research project under close faculty supervision. The DUS advises on general issues of project design, format, approach, general research methodologies, and timetable. In addition, students work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of the thesis and can advise on the specifics of method and content. The thesis will be jointly evaluated by the adviser, the DUS, and the honors thesis TA. The DUS will lead students through a variety of exercises that are directly geared to facilitating the thesis. Students build their research, interpretive, and writing skills; discuss methodological approaches; write an annotated bibliography; learn to give constructive feedback to peers and respond to feedback effectively. The final product is a polished research paper in the range of 40-60 pages. Please note: This is a one-year course that begins in the fall semester (1 point) and continues through the spring semester (3 points). Only students who have completed both semesters will receive the full 4 points of credit.

Fall 2020: MDES UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 3960 001/13444 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Timothy Mitchell 4 8/12

CLME GU4042 Cinematic Cities/Comparative Modernities. 4 points.

Mandatory film screenings will follow each class meeting.

This graduate seminar explores the representational, imaginative, and analytical connections between cinema and the urban experience. Theories of modernity frequently hold up the city as the most emblematic site for locating the modern (eg. Benjamin, Simmel, Kracaueur). Cinema, too, as art and apparatus, can be said to have embodied the ‘shocks’ of the modern (Singer, Gunning, Eisenstein). This course introduces students to a significant corpus of literature on cinema and mediated urbanisms. By insisting on a comparative approach, the seminar seeks to put existing theories of cinematic urbanisms  that pertain to Berlin, Paris, or Los Angeles, into dialogue with ‘other’ cinematic sites such as Mumbai, Algiers, Mexico City, Istanbul, Kuala Lumpur, or Dakar. Open to qualified undergraduates with instructor permission. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: CLME GU4042
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLME 4042 001/13148 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Debashree Mukherjee 4 13/25

MDES GU4049 Climate and Empire. 4 points.

Climate change destabilizes the ontic certainty of this world, time, and history. This course in MESAAS will introduce students to the literature on climate change and its relationship to ontology, religion, violence, politics, and gender. We will explore the resilience and limitations of various theoretical approaches as they relate to empirical cases. Students will become familiarized with important arguments that have been advanced to explain climate change in its more recent incarnations in the Middle East and Asia. How have different trajectories of understanding climate change led to different kinds of political cultures and governing institutions? Have some qualities of the “environment” or “climate” remained the same throughout history and across the globe? What is the role of colonialism in modern understandings of climate change?  The core of this course will seek to develop a mode of conceptualizing the present by rendering relevant geological time in addition to historical time, earth’s history in addition to world’s history.


The course begins with the question of how the “climate” has been historically and ethnographically conceptualized in various intellectual trajectories of human sciences. We consider how religion is connected to environmental change, how the “human” and “non human” are conceptualized in various ontologies, and how religious norms and ethics enact environmental practices. We interrogate the everyday sociality of climate adaption and how climate conflict informs social, political, and environmental citizenship. The course concludes by contemplating the creative ways of being in this new world. We study the innovative forms of cosmopolitan neo-humanism (post- humanism) that emerge from the specter of environmental change.

MDES GU4122 The Novel in Africa. 4 points.

The main task of this course will be to read novels by African writers. But "the novel in Africa" also involves connections between the literary genre of the novel and the historical processes of colonialism, decolonization, and globalization in Africa. One important question we'll consider is how African novels depict those historical experiences in their themes and plots—we'll read novels that are "about" colonialism, etc. A more complex question is how these historical processes relate to the emergence of the novel as an important genre for African writers. Edward Said went so far as to say that without imperialism, there would be no European novel as we know it. How can we understand the novel in Africa (whether read or written) as a product of the colonial encounter? How did it shape the process of decolonization? What contribution to history, whether literary or political, does the novel in Africa make? We'll undertake a historical survey of African novels from the 1930s to the present, with attention to various subgenres (village novel, war novel, urbanization novel, novel of postcolonial disillusion, Bildungsroman). We'll attend to how African novelists blend literate and oral storytelling traditions, how they address their work to local and global audiences, and how they use scenes of characters reading novels (whether African or European) in order to position their writing within national, continental, and world literary space.

MDES GU4151 Debates on Capitalism: Africans and the Eurocentric Lens. 4 points.

Within the literature on the history of capitalism there is a lively debate that seeks to explain the world-historical transition from feudal and tributary modes of production to the capitalist mode of production. Substantial issues raised in this debate include the question of whether capitalism can be characterized as a mode of production dominated by the exploitation of free labour; the role of international trade in the origin and development of capitalism; and the role of agriculture in promoting a transition to capitalism. Through the publication of two key texts in the late 1970s Robert Brenner's proposition that capitalism had its origins in English agriculture came to dominate the transition debate. More recently, however, there have been a number of publications that seek to challenge the Anglo-centric and Eurocentric tendencies of the entire transition debate. This course begins with the Brenner debates and then takes up revisions, critiques and challenges to that debate. Ultimately, the aim of the course is to more clearly understand the place of non-European polities and peoples in the history and development of capitalism.

Fall 2020: MDES GU4151
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4151 001/14420 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Elleni Zeleke 4 5/25

HSME GU4154 Pan-Africanism: - History of an Idea and Ideas About History. 4 points.

“Pan Africanist” ideologies were very diverse from Garveyism, Negritude to the various African America, Caribbean and African discourses of “neo-pharaohnism” and “Ethiopianism.”  This seminar explores how Black leaders, intellectuals, and artists chose to imagine Black (Africans and people of African descent) as a global community from the late 19th century to the present. It examines their attempts to chart a course of race, modernity, and emancipation in unstable and changing geographies of empire, nation, and state.  Particular attention will be given to manifestations identified as their common history and destiny and how such a distinctive historical experience has created a unique body of reflections on and cultural productions about modernity, religion, class, gender, and sexuality, in a context of domination and oppression.  

MDES GU4160 Major Debates in the Study of Africa. 4 points.

This course will focus on key debates that have shaped the study of Africa in the post-colonial African academy.


We will cover six key debates: Historiography; Slavery: Premodern and Modern; State Formation; Colonialism and Difference; Nationalism; Political Identity and Political Violence


The approach will be multi-disciplinary. To the extent possible, readings will be illustrative of different sides in the debate.

CLME GU4231 Cold War Arab Culture. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course studies the effects and strategies of the cold war on Arab writing, education, arts and translation, and the counter movement in Arab culture to have its own identities. As the cold war functioned and still functions on a global scale, thematic and methodological comparisons are drawn with Latin America, India and Africa.

Spring 2021: CLME GU4231
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLME 4231 001/11268 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Muhsin Al-Musawi 4 0/22

CLME GU4241 Sufism: Primary Texts and Contexts. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course studies Sufism as it has emerged, developed, and assumed its presence in Sufi autobiographies and religious and literary writings. The Sufi Path is traced in these writings that include poems like ibn al-Farid’s Poem of the Way. Sufi States and Stations are analyzed to understand this Path that reaches its culmination in an ecstatic sense of Oneness. Sufism is also a social and political phenomenon that unsettles formal theologies and involves Sufis in controversies that often end with their imprisonment and death.

MDES G4253 Islamic Law: The Three Debates. 4 points.

Not offered during 2020-21 academic year.

Prerequisites: ASCM V2003 or equivalent.

This seminar deals with three paradigmatic sets of questions in the history of Islamic law, each set representing and encompassing key themes pertaining to three important historical phases. Long-standing debates on the “origins” of the Shari‘a will be explored, as will the constitution of the formative period, which is variably claimed to stretch from two to four centuries. Scholarship on this period will be examined as ideology. In the second set of questions, squarely situated in the post-formative period (ca. 11th – 17th c.) we examine the relationship between and among social custom, juridical practice and formal legal doctrine, discussing in outline the structural mechanisms the Shari‘a has developed to accommodate legal change. Scholarship on this period and on what the features of this period came to represent in the overall constructed history of the Shari‘a will also be examined as ideology. In the third set of questions, we analyze so-called legal reform and the role of state in converting the Shari‘a to a modern institution that is qualitatively different from its pre-modern predecessor. Scholarship on the Shari‘a in the modern period will also be examined as ideology. Finally, but not necessarily at the end of the course, we will pose questions about the nature of interpretation and language in the construction of a paradigmatic idea (and history) of the Shari‘a.

MDES GU4259 War Narrative: The Arab World. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course works along a number of axial structures that   aim to let texts voice their informing theoretical, political, and poetic strategies. It draws on war narratives in other parts of the world, especially Vietnam, insofar as these find their way into Arabic writing. A poetics of prose gives these narratives the power of literary production that makes them more readable, appealing, and provocative than ordinary journalistic reporting.


Through close readings  of  a number of  Arabic war novels and  some long narrative poems, this course  proposes to  address war in its varieties  not only as liberation movements in  Algeria and Palestine,  but also  as an engagement with  invasions, as in  Iraqi narratives of war, or  as conflict as was the case between Iran and Iraq, 1980-1988,  as proxy wars in other parts of the region , or ‘civil’ wars generated and perpetuated by big powers. Although writers are no longer the leaders of thought as in the first half of the 20th century, they resume different roles of exposition, documentation, reinstatement of identities, and geographical and topographical orientation. Narrators and protagonists are not spectators but implicated individuals whose voices give vent to dreams, desires, intimations, and expectations. They are not utterly passive, however. Behind bewilderment and turbulence, there is a will to expose atrocity and brutality. Writing is an effort to regain humanity in an inhuman situation.


The course is planned under thematic and theoretical divisions: one  that takes  writing as a deliberate exposure  of the censored and repressed; another as  a counter shock and awe strategy [ implemented under this name in the wars on Iraq]   whereby brutalities are laid bare; and a third  that claims reporting  in order to explore its limits and complicity. On the geographical level, it takes Algeria, Palestine as locations for liberation movements; Iraq as a site of death; Egypt as the space for statist duplicity  and camouflage; and Lebanon as an initial stage for a deliberate exercise in a seemingly civil war.


A number of films will be shown as part of students’ presentations.

Fall 2020: MDES GU4259
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4259 001/13138 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Muhsin Al-Musawi 4 15/20

CLME GU4262 Themes in the Arabic Novel. 4 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

The focus of this seminar will be novels by Arab writers. The course will explore the history of the Arabic novel: its rise, development, and evolution. We will read and analyze novels belonging to various periods in Arab history and representing diverse points of views, including gender, identities, and different sub-cultures and sub-genres. We will look into the connections therein between the novel and the historical backdrops of colonialism, decolonization, globalization, war, rights and personal independence from several perspectives and writers across the Arab world. We will also consider the modern Arabic novel’s engagement with the global, glocal, and local as well as its nod to the Arabic literary tradition; its engagement with technology, scientific progress, absurdity, loss, trauma, the human condition, as well as dystopic themes.  No knowledge of Arabic is required. 

MDES GU4265 Sufism, Sharia, and Politics. 4.00 points.

This seminar is geared toward advanced undergraduate students. Arguably, Ṣūfism and Sharīʿa constituted the two central domains of premodern Islamic cultures. A central domain is recognized as one that defines other domains. If a domain becomes central, “then the problems of other domains are solved in terms of the central domain—they are considered secondary problems, whose solution follows as a matter of course only if the problems of the central domain are solved” (C. Schmitt). Within this understanding, the seminar aims to introduce the fundamental concepts and (briefly) histories of both Ṣūfism and Sharīʿa, with a focus on how the former overlapped with and was often integral to the latter; how Ṣūfism produced traditions and institutions; and the role it played in the political landscapes of Islam. By necessity, then, the seminar moves from a coverage of Ṣūfī thought and praxis, to community and institution building, to political activism (or inactivism, which is seen here as a move toward the political or ethical). The coverage, deliberately tilted toward Ṣūfism,1 aims to be historical and considerably chronological, moving from the earliest Islamic period to late modernity, including the migration of Ṣūfī entities to the West. In keeping with the claim of Ṣūfism as a central domain, we will examine how this phenomenon, together with the Sharīʿa, rendered the other domains subsidiary to their imperatives. The subordinate idea here is also to try to map out the strongly symbiotic relationship of the two domains, and isolate for analysis contestations and antagonisms. Although the sources – especially the Orientalist – are underdeveloped theoretically, class discussions will call upon the help of various relevant theories in philosophy, intellectual history, politics, and anthropology

Spring 2021: MDES GU4265
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4265 001/10924 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Wael Hallaq 4.00 0/25

MDES GU4349 Concentration Camps from Cuba to East Asia. 3 points.

Forcibly moving civilians to designated areas as a wartime measure has constituted a widely practiced military strategy for centuries. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, colonial powers increasingly provided more structure and organization to these policies of relocation and internment in the Americas, Africa, and East Asia. This course provides a social history of civilian internment and mass murder from late-19th century colonial cases to World War II.


Through case studies of the Spanish-Cuban war, the South African War, the Philippines-American War, the genocide of the Herrero and Nama in Southwest Africa, the Armenian Genocide, and the Holocaust, the course traces the evolution of the concentration camp from a counter-insurgency strategy in wartime to a weapon of mass murder. The course also examines the internment of Japanese Americans, and the Japanese “comfort stations” in comparative perspective.

 

Spring 2021: MDES GU4349
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4349 001/11023 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Khatchig Mouradian 3 0/50

MDES GU4357 WAR,GENOCIDE,& AFTERMATH COMP PERSPECTIV. 3 points.

This 4000-level course examines how societies grapple with the legacy of mass violence, through an exploration of historical texts, memoirs, textbooks, litigation, and media reports and debates on confronting the past. Focusing on case studies of the Herero Genocide, the Armenian genocide during WWI, and the Holocaust and the Comfort Women during WWII, students investigate the crime and its sequelae, looking at how societies deal with skeletons in their closets ( engaging in silence, trivialization, rationalization, and denial to acknowledgment, apology, and repair); surveying responses of survivors and their descendants (with particular attention to intergeneration transmission of trauma, forgiveness, resentment, and the pursuit of redress); and dissecting public debates on modern day issues that harken back to past atrocities. 

Spring 2021: MDES GU4357
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4357 001/11024 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Khatchig Mouradian 3 0/50

MDES GU4399 Literature of the Great War in the Middle East. 3 points.

Some of the best-known literary texts of the previous century harken back to the Great War. And while works of fiction and non-fiction such as Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front, Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, and Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway have become twentieth-century classics; and the poetry of Brooke, Graves, Gurney, Owen, and Sassoon widely celebrated; the Middle East’s contribution to the literature of the Great War is little explored. This course takes us on a literary journey from the trenches of Gallipoli and Mesopotamia, to famine-struck towns of Mount Lebanon, to orphanages in Syria. We will examine poetry (including zajal—colloquial poetry), and memoirs and diaries by the women and men who withstood the ravages of war and helped shape the modern Middle East. Through close reading and content analysis of a diverse constellation of published and unpublished texts, and using secondary sources as guideposts, we will explore “post-Ottoman memoirs” and verse, including translations from the Arabic and Armenian by the instructor.

MDES GU4601 Politics in India. 4 points.

This course will combine study of long-term historical sociology with more short term understanding of policies and their possible effects. Though its main purpose will be to provide students with an understanding of politics after independence, it will argue, methodologically, that this understanding should be based on a study of historical sociology – plotting long-terms shifts in the structure of social power.  The course will start with analyses of the structures of power and ideas about political legitimacy in pre-modern India, and the transformations brought by colonialism into that order. After a brief study of the nature of political order under the colonial state, the courses will focus primarily on the history of the democratic state after independence.

MDES GU4629 Transregional. 4.00 points.

History, Politics, Literature, Society -- all these are studied as within national, or, at best, regional frames. What other scales and approaches might be appropriate to the study of particular phenomena or categories in the past, as well as some of the challenges of the present? This course introduces advanced undergraduates and graduate students to transregional studies. We explore topics, approaches, methods, problems, and disciplines through which we can cross the regions, particularly the regions of MESAAS. Case studies will consider thinking through and with oceanic studies, circulation, diaspora, shared hermeneutical traditions, lingua francas and their stories (world literatures?), and connected histories to rethink concepts of societies, collective affiliations, cosmopolitanism, and world history. Undergraduates must have taken at least one of the following: Intro to Islamic Civ (UN 2003), Intro to Indian Civ (UN 2357), African Before Colonialism (UN 2915), Societies and Cultures across the Indian Ocean (UN 3445), or some equivalent (check with me)

Fall 2020: MDES GU4629
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4629 001/14314 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
403 Knox Hall
Mana Kia 4.00 10/15

MDES GU4637 Cinema and Colonialism in South Asia. 4 points.

What is the relation between cinema and colonialism? This seminar approaches cinema as a dynamic historical agent that aided, negotiated, refracted, and contested the mechanisms and meanings of colonialism in South Asia. We will study cinema as technology, as industry, and as cultural form, paying attention to questions of film finance, on-screen representation, production infrastructures, circuits of distribution, and sites of exhibition. We will watch films made by British ethnographers, Indian expats, Hollywood orientalists, and South Asian nationalists to
study how film served as a key weapon of imperial propaganda as well as anticolonial resistance. From orientalist films that constructed the colony as exotic and dangerous, to the spatial uses of Indian films to reinforce race inequalities in the diaspora (eg. East Africa), cinema is deeply imbricated with colonial strategies of racial, gendered, and caste-based othering. This is a history of cinema as a history of empire; where cinema is not just a text to be read but a cultural, industrial, and social network of power relations.

Spring 2021: MDES GU4637
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4637 001/10909 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Debashree Mukherjee 4 0/20

MDES GU4721 Epics and Empires: Shahnameh. 4 points.

The purpose of this course is an examination of the genre of epic and its narrative connection to empire-building. The primary text that will be used in this critical examination is the Persian epic poem Shahnameh, composed by Abolqasem Ferdowsi circa 1000 CE.

MDES GU4718 Persian Poetry (In Translation). 4 points.

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the long history and multiple genres of Persian poetry. The seminar will begin with the classical period and come down to the contemporary periods. The geographical span of the course extends from Central Asia to the Indian subcontinent to Iran.

Fall 2020: MDES GU4718
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4718 001/14421 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Hamid Dabashi 4 6/25

MDES GU4726 READINGS IN PERSIAN TEXTS. 4.00 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.

Prerequisites: Must have completed MDES 2702, equivalent two years of Persian or the instructor's permission.
May be repeated for credit; content varies. Prerequisites: Must have completed MDES 2702, equivalent two years of Persian or the instructor's permission. This course provides experience reading and analyzing Persian language texts, as well as translating them into English. We will also spend some time learning how to read different kinds of paleography, and about various manuscript and print conventions and practices. Supplementary scholarly readings in English will situate the Persian texts. There will be a translation workshop at the end of the semester with related texts of the students choosing, in preparation for a final translation project. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Spring 2021: MDES GU4726
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4726 001/10916 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Mana Kia 4.00 0/10

MDES GU4733 IRAN:FILM,FICT,POETRY,HIS. 4 points.

Not offered during 2020-21 academic year.

This is a general introduction to modern Iranian history with a particular emphasis on film, fiction, and poetry. Through varied exposure to Iranian film and fiction, and Persian poetry, this course is designed to introduce students to critical themes and creative effervescence of modern Iranian culture. The course will concentrate on Iranian cultural history of the last two centuries, with particular emphasis on contemporary issues. But a broader historical context of the last 1400 years will always inform our discussions.

MDES GU4760 SHI'ITES AND SHI'ISM. 4 points.

This is a seminar devoted to a historical and comparative examination of the rise and spread of Shi’ism from its earliest stages in Islamic history to its contemporary conditions in various nation-states (in India, Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon in particular). In this seminar we will cover a range of issues, extended from historical, doctrinal, intellectual, and spiritual roots of Shi’ism to its contemporary political manifestations. The course is intended as a seminar, and students will be expected to conduct guided research in an aspect of Shi’ism that interests them most. The course will be conducted in a combination of weekly lectures, semester-long research, and seminar conversations. Knowledge of Arabic and Persian is not required for this course but would be highly beneficial in conducting research for the final paper.

CLME GU4764 Modern and Medieval Islamic Political Thought. 4 points.

This course is a comparative examination of modern and medieval Islamic political thoughts. The seminar begins with the roots of Islamic political thoughts in the early Islamic history, as well as Qur'anic revelations and Prophetic Hadith traditions. We will then divide the course into two major components: medieval and modern, with the rise of European colonialism in the late 18th century and early 19th century as the principal catalyst of groundbreaking changes in Islamic political thoughts.

Middle Eastern Language Courses

Arabic
MDES UN1210First Year Arabic I
MDES UN1211First Year Arabic II
MDES UN2208Arabic For Heritage Speakers I
MDES UN2209Arabic For Heritage Speakers II
MDES GU4210Third Year Arabic I
MDES GU4211Third Year Arabic II
MDES GU4214Fourth Year Classical Arabic I
MDES GU4216Advanced Arabic Grammar Review
MDES GU4218Spoken Arabic I
MDES GU4219Spoken Arabic II
Armenian
MDES UN1301ELEMENTARY ARMENIAN I
MDES UN1309Intensive Armenian for Heritage Speakers
MDES UN2301Intermediate Armenian I
MDES GU4314Readings in Armenian Texts
Hebrew
MDES UN1501First Year Modern Hebrew: Elementary I
MDES UN1502First Year Modern Hebrew: Elementary II
MDES UN2501Second Year Modern Hebrew: Intermediate I
MDES UN25022ND YR MOD HEBREW:INTER II
MDES UN2517Hebrew for Heritage Speakers I
MDES GU4501Readings in Hebrew Texts I
MDES GU4510Third Year Modern Hebrew I
MDES GU4511Third Year Modern Hebrew II
Persian
MDES UN1701Elementary Persian I
MDES UN2701INTERMEDIATE PERSIAN I
MDES UN2702Intermediate Persian II
MDES GU4710Advanced Persian I
MDES GU4711Advanced Persian II
MDES GU4712Reading and Grammar Review in Persian
Turkish
MDES UN1901Elementary Modern Turkish I
MDES UN1902Elementary Modern Turkish II
MDES UN2901Intermediate Modern Turkish I
MDES UN2902Intermediate Modern Turkish II
MDES GU4910Advanced Turkish I
MDES GU4911Advanced Turkish II
MDES GU4921Elementary Ottoman Turkish I
MDES GU4922Elementary Ottoman Turkish II
MDES GU4926Intermediate Ottoman Turkish I
MDES GU4927Readings in Ottoman Texts II

South Asian Language Courses (Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit, Tamil)

MDES UN1601 Elementary Hindi-Urdu I. 5 points.

An introduction to the most widely spoken language of South Asia. Along with an understanding of the grammar, the course offers practice in listening and speaking. The Hindi (Devanagari) script is used for reading and writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES UN1601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1601 002/10781 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Online Only
Christine Marrewa Karwoski 5 13/15

MDES UN1608 Hindi for Heritage Speakers I. 5 points.

This is an accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Hindi. They may not have sufficient skills in reading and writing but are able to converse on familiar topics such as: self, family, likes, dislikes and immediate surroundings. This course will focus on developing knowledge of the basic grammar of Hindi and vocabulary enrichment by exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics related to aspects of daily life; and formal and informal registers. Students will be able to read and discuss simple texts and write about a variety of everyday topics by the end of the semester. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES UN1608
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1608 001/10782 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Online Only
Rakesh Ranjan 5 18/15

MDES UN1614 Urdu for Heritage Speakers I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu.

This is an accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu. They are not expected to know how to read and write in Urdu but are able to converse on familiar topics such as self, family, likes, dislikes and immediate surroundings. This course will focus on developing knowledge of the basic grammar of Urdu and vocabulary enrichment by exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics related to aspects of daily life; and formal and informal registers. Students will be able to read and discuss simple Urdu texts  and write about a variety of everyday topics by the end of the semester. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES UN1614
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1614 001/10783 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Online Only
Aftab Ahmad 5 11/15

MDES UN1615 Urdu for Heritage Speakers II. 5 points.

This is an accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu. They are not expected to know how to read and write in Urdu but are able to converse on familiar topics such as self, family, likes, dislikes and immediate surroundings. This course will focus on developing knowledge of the basic grammar of Urdu and vocabulary enrichment by exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics related to aspects of daily life; and formal and informal registers. Students will be able to read and discuss simple Urdu texts  and write about a variety of everyday topics by the end of the semester. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES UN1615
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1615 001/11194 M T W Th 2:40pm - 3:45pm
Room TBA
Aftab Ahmad 5 0/15

MDES UN2601 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: (MDES UN1601) and (MDES UN1602) MDES UN1601-UN1602 or the instructor's permission.

Continuing practice in listening, speaking, and grammatical understanding. Along with the Hindi (Devanagari) script, the Urdu (Perso-Arabic) script is taught in the class; both scripts are used for reading and writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES UN2601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 2601 001/10784 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Online Only
Aftab Ahmad 5 5/15

MDES UN2602 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: MDES W1610-W1611 or the instructor's permission.

Continuing practice in listening, speaking, and grammatical understanding. Along with the Hindi (Devanagari) script, the Urdu (Perso-Arabic) script is taught in the class; both scripts are used for reading and writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES UN2602
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 2602 001/11195 M T W Th 4:10pm - 5:15pm
Room TBA
Aftab Ahmad 5 0/15

MDES GU4611 Readings In Hindi Literature II. 4 points.

May be repeated for credit; content varies.

Prerequisites: MDES UN2602 or the instructor's permission.

This course introduces students to the riches of the classical Hindi Tradition. We read Bhakti and Sufi Literature in tandem , with a special interest in Tulsidas and the Indo-Islamic Romance.


Eligibility: The class is open to undergraduate and graduate students with two or more years of Hindi- Urdu (or permission of the instructor).

MDES GU4624 Advanced Hindi I. 5 points.

Advanced Hindi I and II are third year courses in the Hindi-Urdu program that aim to continue building upon the existing four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) along with grammar and vocabulary in a communicative approach.  The objective of these courses is to strengthen students’ language skills and to go beyond them to understand and describe situations and the speech community, understand and discuss Hindi literature and films, news items, T.V. shows and current events. Students will also be given opportunities to work on their areas of interest such as popular culture, professional and research goals in the target language. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary, enhance grammatical accuracy and develop cultural appropriateness through an enthusiastic participation in classroom activities and immersing themselves in the speech community outside. This course will be taught in the target language.  All kinds of conversations such as daily life, on social/public interests’ topics as well as on academic interests, will occur in the target language. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES GU4624
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4624 001/12540 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Rakesh Ranjan 5 8/15

MDES GU4625 Advanced Hindi II. 5 points.

Advanced Hindi I and II are third year courses in the Hindi-Urdu program that aim to continue building upon the existing four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) along with grammar and vocabulary in a communicative approach.  The objective of these courses is to strengthen students’ language skills and to go beyond them to understand and describe situations and the speech community, understand and discuss Hindi literature and films, news items, T.V. shows and current events. Students will also be given opportunities to work on their areas of interest such as popular culture, professional and research goals in the target language. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary, enhance grammatical accuracy and develop cultural appropriateness through an enthusiastic participation in classroom activities and immersing themselves in the speech community outside. This course will be taught in the target language.  All kinds of conversations such as daily life, on social/public interests’ topics as well as on academic interests, will occur in the target language. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES GU4625
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4625 001/11196 T Th 11:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Rakesh Ranjan 5 0/15

MDES GU4635 Readings In Urdu Literature I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of prior coursework in Hindi-Urdu (MDES UN1612 & MDES UN1613), one year of Urdu for Heritage Speakers (MDES UN1614 & MDES UN1615), or the instructor's permission.

This course is a a literary course, with in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry. In the fall semester, our focus will be on some of the most famous Urdu short stories while, in the spring semester, we will focus on various genres of Urdu poetry. The content may change each semester. This course is open to both undergraduates and graduates. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

MDES GU4636 READINGS IN URDU LIT. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: two years of prior coursework in Hindi-Urdu (MDES W1612 & MDES W1613), one year of Urdu for Heritage Speakers (MDES W1614 & MDES W1615), or the instructor's permission.
Prerequisites: two years of prior coursework in Hindi-Urdu (MDES W1612MDES W1613), one year of Urdu for Heritage Speakers (MDES W1614 & MDES W1615), or the instructors permission. This course is a literary course, with in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry. In the fall semester, our focus will be on some of the most famous Urdu short stories while, in the spring semester, we will focus on various genres of Urdu poetry. The content may change each semester. This course is open to both undergraduates and graduates. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Spring 2021: MDES GU4636
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4636 001/12250 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Room TBA
Aftab Ahmad 4.00 0/15

MDES GU4640 Advanced Urdu. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Two years of prior study in Urdu or one year of Urdu for Heritage Speakers I&II courses at Columbia University, or approval of the professor.

This is a one-semester course in advanced Urdu language. It will be taught in the fall semester. The goal of the course is to develop students’ linguistic skills i.e. listening, speaking, reading, writing and cultural skills in Urdu, and give students in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose. Special emphasis will be given to developing a high-register vocabulary. Necessary grammar points will also be explained for developing an accurate and nuanced understanding of the Urdu language. After completing this course, students will be able to read and enjoy Urdu classics and critical academic texts related to various disciplines i.e. old tales, short stories, essays, history, satire, criticism, politics, current issues etc. along with effective speaking skills suited to active interaction in the speech community and a more advanced academic discussion for undergraduate and graduate students. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of South Asian society and culture as well. This course will prepare students to take MDES GU4635 Readings in Urdu Literature I.

Fall 2020: MDES GU4640
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4640 001/10902 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
Online Only
Aftab Ahmad 4 4/15

MDES UN1401 Elementary Sanskrit I. 4 points.

This course constitutes the first half of a year-long introduction to Classical Sanskrit, the translocal language of religious, intellectual, and literary life in South Asia for nearly two millennia. Assuming no prior experience with the language, this introductory sequence provides students with the grammar, reading strategies, and cultural context necessary to begin accessing the language’s many rich textual traditions, including scripture (śruti), epic (itihāsa), poetry (kāvya), drama (nāṭaka), systematic thought (śāstra), and more.

Fall 2020: MDES UN1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1401 001/11773 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
Online Only
Shiv Subramaniam 4 8/15

MDES UN2401 Intermediate Sanskrit I. 4 points.


Fee: Language Resource Center Fee - 15.00

Prerequisites: Elementary Sanskrit II or instructor permission.

This course constitutes the first half of a year-long reading course designed to give students the tools necessary for advanced study in Classical Sanskrit. Readings in epic (itihāsa), poetry (kāvya), systematic thought (śāstra), and commentary (vyākhyāna) will introduce students to a variety of important genres and their distinctive conventions. A focus upon the Sanskrit tradition’s own categories of analysis—grammatical, commentarial, and prosodic—will enable students to begin to make sense of original Sanskrit texts as generations of the tradition’s own readers have. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: MDES UN2401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 2401 001/11776 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Shiv Subramaniam 4 3/15

MDES GU4810 ADVANCED SANSKRIT I. 4.00 points.

Prerequisites: Two years of Sanskrit or the instructor's permission.
This course constitutes the first half of a year-long advanced reading course in Classical Sanskrit. In 2020-2021, the focus of Advanced Sanskrit will be the genre of scholastic, commentarial prose (śāstra). Placing equal attention on stylistic conventions, discursive strategies, and technical vocabulary, this course will introduce students to select philosophical debates lying at the intersections of epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language. Textual excerpts may be drawn from an array of intellectual disciplines, including Nyāya, Mīmāṃsā, Yogācāra, and Vyākaraṇa. Rigorous analysis of primary texts will be supplemented with occasional discussions about what implications the disciplined reading of Sanskrit śāstra may hold for practices such as translation, comparative philosophy, and transdisciplinarity. Prerequisites: Intermediate Sanskrit II or instructor’s permission. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Fall 2020: MDES GU4810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4810 001/13736 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Tyler Richard 4.00 5/25

MDES GU4812 Advanced Sanskrit II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Two years of Sanskrit or the instructor's permission.

Prerequisites: Two years of Sanskrit or the instructor's permission. The two levels of advanced Sanskrit are given in alternate years. In 2017-2018 court literature (fall) and literary criticism (spring) will be offered; in 2018-2019, philosophy. Close reading of major works, exploring both philological and literary-theoretical aspects of the texts. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES GU4812
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4812 001/10905 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
4 0/15

MDES UN1101 Elementary Tamil I. 4 points.

This course constitutes the first half of a year-long introduction to Tamil, the official language of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu as well as an official language of Sri Lanka and Singapore. In addition to being spoken by almost 80 million people worldwide, Tamil also has an impressive classical past, having served as a language of religious, intellectual, and literary life in South India for nearly two millennia. Assuming no prior experience with the language, this introductory sequence provides students with the grammar, language skills, and cultural context necessary for achieving their individual Tamil language goals, whether they be conducting fieldwork or scholarly research, chatting with relatives back home, or simply waxing poetic over an artful dosai. In order to cultivate students’ reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension skills, this course draws upon a wide variety of teaching materials, including the core textbook, oral drills, audio recordings, short films, music videos, memes, and more. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

,
 
Fall 2020: MDES UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1101 001/11769 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Shiv Subramaniam 4 11/15

MDES UN1102 Elementary Tamil II. 4 points.

Introduces students to the basic grammatical and syntactical skills required to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in that region of the world. Introduces students to the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: MDES UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1102 001/11151 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Shiv Subramaniam 4 0/15

MDES UN2101 Intermediate Tamil I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: MDES W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

Further develops students' written and oral proficiency in order to allow them to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in a Tamil-speaking context. Develops the students' appreciation for the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

MDES UN2102 Intermediate Tamil II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: MDES W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

Further develops students' written and oral proficiency in order to allow them to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in a Tamil-speaking context. Develops the students' appreciation for the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

MDES UN3301 Advanced Tamil I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: MDES W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission.

This course aims at students improving further their language proficiency. It aims at students getting introduced to the long and continuous literary history of Tamil by reading non-contemporary Tamil writings, sometimes the ancient Tamil literary works.

MDES UN3302 Advanced Tamil II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Advanced Tamil I or instructor permission.

This course aims at students improving further their language proficiency. It aims at students getting introduced to the long and continuous literary history of Tamil by reading non-contemporary Tamil writings, sometimes the ancient Tamil literary works.  

African Language Courses (Pulaar, Swahili, Wolof) *for Arabic Language Courses, see Middle Eastern Languages, above

PULA UN1101 Elementary Pulaar I. 4 points.

This course offers students an introduction to the basic structures of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

PULA UN1102 Elementary Pulaar II. 4 points.

This course offers students an introduction to the basic structures of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

PULA UN2101 Intermediate Pulaar I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PULA W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

This course further develops a student's knowledge of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

PULA UN2102 Intermediate Pulaar II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PULA W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

This course further develops a student's knowledge of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

SWHL UN1101 Elementary Swahili I. 4 points.

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: SWHL UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SWHL 1101 001/10606 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
Online Only
Abdul Nanji 4 16/20

SWHL UN1102 Elementary Swahili II. 4 points.

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2021: SWHL UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SWHL 1102 001/11325 M T W Th 9:10am - 10:00am
Room TBA
Abdul Nanji 4 0/20

SWHL UN2101 Intermediate Swahili I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SWHL W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

A review of the essentials of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: SWHL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SWHL 2101 001/10607 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:00am
Online Only
Abdul Nanji 4 6/15

SWHL UN3301 Advanced Swahili I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SWHL UN2101-UN2102 or the instructor's permission.

An introduction to the advanced syntactical, morphological, and grammatical structures of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: SWHL UN3301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SWHL 3301 001/10608 M W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
403 Knox Hall
Abdul Nanji 4 3/15

SWHL UN3302 Advanced Swahili II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Advanced Swahili I or the instructor's permission.

An introduction to the advanced syntactical, morphological, and grammatical structures of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

WLOF UN1101 Elementary Wolof I. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: WLOF UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WLOF 1101 001/10875 M T W Th 12:10pm - 1:00pm
Online Only
Mariame Sy 4 6/12

WLOF UN2101 Intermediate Wolof I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

Further develops a student's knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2020: WLOF UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WLOF 2101 001/10877 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Mariame Sy 4 2/12
WLOF 2101 002/24474 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Mariame Sy 4 3/15

WLOF UN3301 Advanced Wolof I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Two years of Wolof or instructor permission.

No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Fall 2020: WLOF UN3301
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WLOF 3301 001/10879 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Online Only
Mariame Sy 4 3/12

WLOF UN3302 Advanced Wolof II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Advanced Wolof I or instructor permission.

This course will further your awareness and understanding of the Wolof language and culture, as well as improve your mastery of grammar, writing skills, and oral expression. Course materials will incorporate various types of text including tales, poetry, literature as well as multimedia such as films, and videos, television and radio programs.

Spring 2021: WLOF UN3302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WLOF 3302 001/11334 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Mariame Sy 4 0/15

Of Related Interest

History (Barnard)