Philosophy

Departmental Office: 708 Philosophy; 212-854-3196
www.philosophy.columbia.edu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: David Albert, 706 Philosophy; 212-854-3519; da5@columbia.edu

Economics-Philosophy Adviser: Jessica Collins, 714 Philosophy; 212-854-3970; jessica.collins@columbia.edu

Students interested in philosophy may pursue a major either in philosophy or in economics-philosophy. Because philosophy treats issues fundamental to both the sciences and the humanities, students are also welcome to combine their philosophy major with work in other fields. Before declaring a major in philosophy or economics-philosophy, and before deciding to combine philosophy with another discipline, students should meet with the director of undergraduate studies to formulate the program best for them.

Philosophy majors are given a foundation in logic and philosophical methodology, and are asked to confront fundamental questions in the main areas of philosophy: epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy, philosophy of mind and language, and history of philosophy. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar (PHIL UN3912), designed to allow students to focus on particular philosophical issues or texts in greater depth. Outstanding seniors may also pursue their own philosophical project in a senior thesis.

Over and above the courses required of all majors, there is room for considerable flexibility. Through an appropriate choice of electives from among the department’s offerings (and from related courses in other departments), there are special opportunities for focusing more intensively on one or two subfields of philosophy, e.g., logic and the philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of science, ethics and political philosophy, or the history of philosophy. Students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies on how best to pursue such programs.

Study Abroad: Reid Hall, Paris

For information on the Columbia in Paris Program at Reid Hall, including summer courses, consult the Columbia University in Paris Bulletin (available in 606 Kent and online at the Office of Global Programs website), call 212-854-2559, or send an email to reidhall@columbia.edu. For information on applicability of Reid Hall courses to the major or concentration, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Grading

Courses in which a grade of D has been received do not count toward the major or concentration requirements.

Senior Thesis

Undergraduates majoring in Philosophy or Economics-Philosophy may propose to write a senior thesis. Students who wish to write a thesis should approach a faculty member at the end of their junior or beginning of their senior year, and begin working on the proposal early in the fall semester of their senior year.  Proposals are due in early December, and will be reviewed by a committee which will include the Director of Undergraduate Studies; students will be notified of the committee’s decision within two weeks.  Students whose proposals are approved should register for their faculty advisor’s section of Supervised Independent Research for the spring term of the senior year. Theses are due in early April. 

Students who have a grade point average of 3.6 or above in the major and who complete a thesis will be placed into consideration for departmental honors, though any senior may complete a thesis regardless of their grade point average (upon approval of the proposal).

See the full policy and procedure concerning senior theses on the departmental webpage:

http://philosophy.columbia.edu/content/senior-thesis-philosophy

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are highly competitive.  Normally no more than 10% of the majors graduating in the department each year will receive departmental honors.  

In order to qualify for departmental honors in philosophy, a student must have a grade point average of at least 3.6 in the major.  
For students with a GPA of 3.6 or above, there are two possible routes to consideration:

  1. A student may complete a senior thesis; those students who complete senior theses will automatically be considered for honors without having to be nominated.
  2. A student may be nominated by a faculty member early in the spring semester of the senior year; nominated students will be invited to submit a writing sample at least 15 pages in length.  A nominated student who is also writing a thesis may submit their thesis as the writing sample, or may choose to submit a different work.

Both the senior theses and writing samples are due in early April.  The departmental honors committee will then review the submitted material and the academic records of the writers, and will report to the full faculty.  

The full faculty will then decide which students to recommend for departmental honors to the Columbia College and General Studies administrations.  

Professors

  • David Albert
  • Akeel Bilgrami
  • Taylor Carman (Barnard)
  • Haim Gaifman
  • Lydia Goehr
  • Robert Gooding-Williams
  • Axel Honneth
  • Jenann Ismael
  • Patricia Kitcher
  • Philip Kitcher
  • Wolfgang Mann 
  • Christia Mercer
  • Michele Moody-Adams
  • John Morrison (Barnard)
  • Fred Neuhouser (Barnard)
  • Christopher Peacocke 
  • Carol Rovane
  • Achille Varzi
  • Katja Vogt

Associate Professors

  • Jessica Collins

Assistant Professors

  • Justin Clarke-Doane
  • Melissa Fusco
  • Dhananjay Jagannathan
  • Tamar Lando
  • Karen Lewis (Barnard)
  • Francey Russell (Barnard)
  •  
  •  

Affiliated Faculty

  • Souleymane Bachir Diagne (French and Romance Philology)
  • Jon Elster (Political Science)
  • Kent Greenawalt (University Professor)
  • Wayne Proudfoot (Religion)
  • Joseph Raz (Law School)
  • Gayatri Spivak (University Professor)

Major in Philosophy

Students considering a major in philosophy are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year. All majors must consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for classes in order to plan and update their individual programs of study.

Students planning to major in philosophy are advised to begin with PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. Beginning students are especially encouraged to take 2000-level courses, both in the history of philosophy and in systematic philosophy. These courses are typically less specialized and less narrowly focused than higher-numbered ones. More advanced students are encouraged to take 3000-level courses. The department requires that all majors take at least one seminar, PHIL UN3912.

No more than one course at the 1000-level can be counted toward the major. In order to enroll in one of the 4000-level courses, students must have taken at least four courses in Philosophy.

The major requires a minimum of 30 points in philosophy chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU:

PHIL UN2101The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine
PHIL UN2201History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant
PHIL UN3411Symbolic Logic
At least one course in either metaphysics or epistemology e.g., PHIL W3960, or a related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
Select at least one course in either ethics or social and political philosophy from the following:
Contemporary Moral Problems
Ethics
SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
A related course to be chosen in consultation with the director of undergradute studies.
PHIL UN3912Seminar

Concentration in Philosophy

Philosophy, as an academic discipline, has significant points of contact with a wide range of other subjects—in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. A concentration in philosophy thus can be an attractive option for many students. Those considering becoming concentrators are strongly encouraged to meet with the director of undergraduate studies early in their sophomore year, in order to discuss their specific interests and to plan their programs of study. All concentrators should consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term before registering for courses.

The concentration requires a minimum of 24 points in philosophy, chosen from courses prefixed with UN or GU. There are no specific courses required for the concentration.

Students may choose courses prefixed with GR only with the instructor’s permission. 

PHIL UN3912 is open to junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four courses in philosophy.


Major in Economics-Philosophy

Please read Guidelines for all Economics Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors in the Economics section of this Bulletin.

Economics-Philosophy is an interdisciplinary major that, while introducing students to the basic methodologies of economics and philosophy, stresses areas of particular concern to both. These include subjects such as rationality and decision making, justice and efficiency, freedom and collective choice, and the logic of empirical theories and their testing. Many of the issues are dealt with historically, and classic texts of Plato, Kant, Mill, Marx, and Smith are reviewed.

Two advisers are assigned for the interdepartmental major, one in the Department of Economics and one in the Department of Philosophy. Please note that the Economics adviser can only advise on the Economics requirements and the Philosophy adviser can only advise on the Philosophy requirements.

The Economics-Philosophy major requires a total minimum of 54 points: 25 points in Economics, 16 points in Philosophy, 6 points in Mathematics, 3 points in Statistics, and 4 points in the interdisciplinary seminar as follows:

Economics Core Courses
ECON UN1105Principles of Economics
ECON UN3211Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON UN3213Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON UN3412Introduction To Econometrics
Mathematics Sequence
Select a mathematics sequence
Statistics
Select a statistics course
Economics Electives
Three electives are required; refer to the Economics section of this bulletin.
Philosophy Courses
PHIL UN1010Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought
PHIL UN3411Symbolic Logic
PHIL UN3701Ethics (a social or political philosophy course may be substituted, please consult the Philosophy DUS)
PHIL UN3551Philosophy of Science
or PHIL UN3960 Epistemology
PHIL GU4561Probability and Decision Theory
Seminar
ECPH GU4950Economics and Philosophy Seminar (or another seminar in philosophy or economics approved by advisers in both department)

Students who declared before Spring 2014:

The requirements for this program were modified in 2014. Students who declared this program before Spring 2014 should contact the director of undergraduate studies for the department in order to confirm their options for major requirements.

Fall 2020

PHIL UN1001 Introduction to Philosophy. 3 points.

Survey of some of the central problems, key figures, and great works in both traditional and contemporary philosophy.  Topics and texts will vary with instructor and semester.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1001 001/00062 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Francey Russell 3 30/40
PHIL 1001 002/00716 M T Th F 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Taylor Carman 3 20/30
Spring 2021: PHIL UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1001 001/00002 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Francey Russell 3 0/40

PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. 3 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/10362 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Akeel Bilgrami 3 69/80
Spring 2021: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11497 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
David Albert 3 0/80

PHIL UN1401 Introduction to Logic. 3 points.

Explicit criteria for recognizing valid and fallacious arguments, together with various methods for schematizing discourse for the purpose of logical analysis. Illustrative material taken from science and everyday life.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN1401
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1401 001/00063 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Karen Lewis 3 22/65

PHIL UN2101 The History of Philosophy I: Presocratics to Augustine. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V2111 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Exposition and analysis of the positions of the major philosophers from the pre-Socratics through Augustine.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2101 001/10361 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Online Only
Katja Vogt 4 99/100

PHIL UN3264 19th Century Philosophy: Hegel. 3 points.

Prerequisites: PHIL UN2201 or PHIL UN3251

Examines major themes of Hegel's philosophy, with emphasis on social and political thought. Topics include Hegel's critique of Kant, the possibility of metaphysics, the master-slave dialectic, and the role of freedom in a rational society. Readings from Kant’s Third Critique help explain how Hegel's project develops out of Kant's transcendental idealism. Some knowledge of Kant's moral theory and his Critique of Pure Reason is presupposed. Prerequisite: at least one of PHIL UN2201, PHIL UN2301, or PHIL UN3251.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3264
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3264 001/00066 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Frederick Neuhouser 3 28/40

PHIL UN3353 European Social Philosophy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: one philosophy course.

A survey of Eurpoean social philosophy from the 18th to the 20th century, with special attention to theories of capitalism and the normative concepts (freedom, alienation, human flourishing) that inform them.  Also: the relationship between civil society and the state.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3353
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3353 001/10366 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Online Only
Axel Honneth 3 44/80

PHIL UN3411 Symbolic Logic. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable. This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/10367 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Tamar Lando 4 89/100
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11499 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 4 0/100

PHIL UN3551 Philosophy of Science. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 40.

Prerequisites: one philosophy course or the instructor's permission.

Philosophical problems within science and about the nature of scientific knowledge in the 17th-20th centuries. Sample problems: causation and scientific explanation; induction and real kinds; verification and falsification; models, analogies and simulations; the historical origins of the modern sciences; scientific revolutions; reductionism and supervenience; differences between physics, biology and the social sciences; the nature of life; cultural evolution; human nature; philosophical issues in cosmology.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3551
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3551 001/10372 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Online Only
Jenann Ismael 3 41/49

PHIL UN3601 Metaphysics. 4 points.

Discussion Section Required

Corequisites: PHIL V3611 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Systematic treatment of some major topics in metaphysics (e.g. modality, causation, identity through time, particulars and universals). Readings from contemporary authors.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3601
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3601 001/10373 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Online Only
Justin Clarke-Doane 4 33/80

PHIL UN3716 Topics in Ethics. 3 points.

Enrollment limited to 40.

Classic justtifications of normative ethical positions through appeals to Nature in Aristotle, Reason in Kant, Sentiment in Hume, and History in Hegel.  Twentieth-Century Analyses of ethical statements from G.E. Moore's intuitionism through A.J. Ayer and C.L. Stevenson on Logical Positivism, J.P. Sarte's Existentialism, John Dewey's Progmatism, and cognitive rationality in Stuart Hampshire and Philippa Foot.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3716
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3716 001/00137 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Francey Russell 3 31/40

PHIL UN3752 Philosophy of Law. 3 points.

This course explores philosophical reflection on the relationship between law, society and morality. We discuss the nature of law, the nature of legal reasoning, the relationship between law and social policy, and central concepts in civil and criminal law. Readings are drawn from such sources as the natural law tradition, legal positivism, legal realism, and Critical Legal Theory. Readings will be supplemented by analysis of classic cases.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3752
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3752 001/10376 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Online Only
Michele Moody-Adams 3 63/80

PHIL UN3858 CULTIVATING INDIVIDUALITY. 3 points.

Talk about "individuality" , about "being" (or becoming) "yourself" is all around us. But what exactly does this mean? What is genuine individuality, and how can we develop, it in ourselves (through self-development) and in others (by designing appropriate educational institutions)? What is the relationship between an individual and being a part of society? Is there a tension between non-conformism often associated with genuine individuality on the one hand, and the demands of community and good citizenship, on the other? Can educational institutions be designed to fulfill both those demands (to the extent they are distinct)? And how might opressive social institutions hinder the development of "individuality" ? in this course, we will explore these and related questions by drawing both on the classics of philosophy of education (Plato, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Dewey, BeDois), and on relevant literary material that is in conversation with the philosophical texts (Rilke, Tolstoy, Woolfe).

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3858
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3858 001/15298 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Natalia Alexander 3 14/15

PHIL UN3912 Seminar. 3 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 011/10490 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Jenann Ismael 3 13/20
PHIL 3912 014/00138 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Frederick Neuhouser 3 12/20
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 001/11517 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Lydia Goehr 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 003/11503 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Aminah Hasan 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 004/12117 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 018/11502 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 3 0/20

PHIL UN3996 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

PHIL UN3997 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 001/15332  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 002/15331  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 003/15330  
Taylor Carman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 004/15329  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 005/15333  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 006/15334  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 007/15335  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 008/15336  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 010/15338  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 011/15339  
Jenann Ismael 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 013/15341  
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 014/15342  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 015/15343  
Karen Lewis 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 016/15344  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 017/15345  
Christia Mercer 3 1/5
PHIL 3997 018/15346  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 019/15347  
John Morrison 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 020/15348  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 021/15349  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 022/15350  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 023/15351  
Francey Russell 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 024/15352  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3997 025/15353  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3997 018/12858  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5

PHIL GU4055 Aesthetics: Modern Survey II. 3 points.

Open to senior undergraduates with previous work in the history of philosophy and to graduate students. Priority is given to students who have taken Aesthetics: Historical Survey I.

This course is a critical examination of the major texts in aesthetics including Dewey, Collingwood, Croce, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Adorno, Benjamin, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Wollheim, Goodman, Cavell, and Danto. Aesthetics: Modern Survey I is not a pre-requiste, but preference is given to those students who have taken it.

Fall 2020: PHIL GU4055
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4055 001/10380 M W 6:10pm - 8:15pm
Online Only
Lydia Goehr 3 24/30

PHIL GU4424 Modal Logic. 3 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

Fall 2020: PHIL GU4424
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4424 001/15254 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Online Only
Tamar Lando 3 11/40

PHIL GU4561 Probability and Decision Theory. 3 points.

Examines interpretations and applications of the calculus of probability including applications as a measure of degree of belief, degree of confirmation, relative frequency, a theoretical property of systems, and other notions of objective probability or chance. Attention to epistimological questions such as Hume's problem of induction, Goodman's problem of projectibility, and the paradox of confirmation.

Fall 2020: PHIL GU4561
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4561 001/10381 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Online Only
Jessica Collins 3 18/40

PHIL GU4900 Topics in Early Modern Philosophy. 3 points.

Open to undergraduates with previous work in the history of philosophy and to graduate students. Focuses either on an important topic in the history of early modern philosophy (e.g., skepticism, causation, mind, body) or on the philosophy of a major figure in the period (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Gassendi, Conway). 

Fall 2020: PHIL GU4900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 4900 001/10377 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
301m Fayerweather
Aminah Hasan 3 10/35

Spring 2021

PHIL UN1010 Methods and Problems of Philosophical Thought. 3 points.

Critical introduction to philosophical problems, ideas and methods.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/10362 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Online Only
Akeel Bilgrami 3 69/80
Spring 2021: PHIL UN1010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 1010 001/11497 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
David Albert 3 0/80

PHIL UN2108 Philosophy and History. 3 points.

An introduction to historical (from 1800) and contemporary themes in the philosophy of history. Themes include Historicism, Historicity, Universality and Particularity; the debate over Positivism; the historical nature of concepts and meaning; time and tense: Past, Present Future; the Temporality of experience; the nature of Tradition and Practice; Epistemic, Revolutionary, and Paradigmatic change; Memory and the writing of one’s history (Autobiography).  

Spring 2021: PHIL UN2108
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2108 001/11498 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Lydia Goehr 3 0/80

PHIL UN2201 History of Philosophy II: Aquinas to Kant. 4 points.

Prerequisites: PHIL UN2211 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

PHIL UN2101 is not a prerequisite for this course. Exposition and analysis of the metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy of the major philosophers from Aquinas through Kant. Authors include Aquinas, Galileo, Gassendi, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.  This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Spring 2021: PHIL UN2201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2201 001/00003 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
John Morrison 4 0/80

PHIL UN3411 Symbolic Logic. 4 points.

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement, Recitation Section Required

Corequisites: PHILV3413 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable. This course has unrestricted enrollment.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/10367 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
Online Only
Tamar Lando 4 89/100
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3411
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/11499 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 4 0/100

PHIL UN3701 Ethics. 4 points.

Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
Corequisites: PHIL V3711 Required Discussion Section (0 points).

This course is mainly an introduction to three influential approaches to normative ethics: utilitarianism, deontological views, and virtue ethics. We also consider the ethics of care, and selected topics in meta-ethics.

Spring 2021: PHIL UN3701
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3701 001/11501 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Michele Moody-Adams 4 0/80

PHIL UN3751 SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 3.00 points.

Six major concepts of political philosophy including authority, rights, equality, justice, liberty and democracy are examined in three different ways. First the conceptual issues are analyzed through contemporary essays on these topics by authors like Peters, Hart, Williams, Berlin, Rawls and Schumpeter. Second the classical sources on these topics are discussed through readings from Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Marx, Plato, Mill and Rousseau. Third some attention is paid to relevant contexts of application of these concepts in political society, including such political movements as anarchism, international human rights, conservative, liberal, and Marxist economic policies as well as competing models of democracy.

Spring 2021: PHIL UN3751
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3751 001/11505 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
Room TBA
Axel Honneth 3.00 0/80

PHIL UN3912 Seminar. 3 points.

Required of senior majors, but also open to junior majors, and junior and senior concentrators who have taken at least four philosophy courses. This exploration will typically involve writing a substantial research paper. Capped at 20 students with preference to philosophy majors.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 011/10490 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Online Only
Jenann Ismael 3 13/20
PHIL 3912 014/00138 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Frederick Neuhouser 3 12/20
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3912 001/11517 M W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Lydia Goehr 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 003/11503 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Aminah Hasan 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 004/12117 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/20
PHIL 3912 018/11502 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Achille Varzi 3 0/20

PHIL UN3960 Epistemology. 4 points.

Corequisites: PHIL UN3963

What can we know? What is knowledge? What are the different kinds of knowledge? We will read classic and contemporary texts for insight into these questions.

Spring 2021: PHIL UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/11506 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
Room TBA
Justin Clarke-Doane 4 0/80

PHIL UN3996 Supervised Senior Research. 3 points.

Supervised research under the direction of individual members of the department.

PHIL UN3998 Supervised Individual Research. 3 points.

Fall 2020: PHIL UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3998 001/15410  
David Albert 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 002/15411  
Akeel Bilgrami 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 003/15412  
Taylor Carman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 004/15413  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 005/15414  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 006/15415  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 007/15416  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 008/15417  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 010/15419  
Axel Honneth 3 1/5
PHIL 3998 011/15420  
Jenann Ismael 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 014/15425  
Tamar Lando 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 015/15426  
Karen Lewis 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 016/15427  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 018/15429  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 019/15430  
John Morrison 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 020/15431  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 021/15432  
Christopher Peacocke 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 022/15433  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 023/15434  
Francey Russell 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 024/15435  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 025/15436  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5
Spring 2021: PHIL UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3998 003/12871  
Taylor Carman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 004/12872  
Justin Clarke-Doane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 005/12880  
Jessica Collins 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 006/12882  
Melissa Fusco 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 007/12883  
Haim Gaifman 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 008/12884  
Lydia Goehr 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 009/12886  
Robert Gooding-Williams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 010/12889  
Axel Honneth 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 013/12897  
Patricia Kitcher 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 015/12895  
Karen Lewis 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 016/12898  
Wolfgang Mann 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 018/12901  
Michele Moody-Adams 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 019/12907  
John Morrison 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 020/12915  
Frederick Neuhouser 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 022/12919  
Carol Rovane 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 023/12925  
Francey Russell 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 024/12928  
Achille Varzi 3 0/5
PHIL 3998 025/12932  
Katja Vogt 3 0/5

ECPH GU4950 Economics and Philosophy Seminar. 4 points.

Open only to economics-philosophy majors who are in their senior year.

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, ECON W3213, ECON W3412. Students will be contacted by the Economics department for pre-enrollment.

Explores topics in the philosophy of economics such as welfare, social choice, and the history of political economy. Sometimes the emphasis is primarily historical and someimes on analysis of contemporary economic concepts and theories.

Spring 2021: ECPH GU4950
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECPH 4950 001/11510 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jessica Collins 4 0/40